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Topic: Q for JB - "Solidity" & Line Thickness (Topic Closed Topic Closed) Post ReplyPost New Topic
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Rene Ritchie
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Joined: 17 April 2006
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Posted: 28 June 2006 at 12:39pm | IP Logged | 1  

I've just gotten to the point in X-Men Omnibus where you take over the art, and I was immediately impressed with just how "solid" (I don't know if that's the right word) your characters were. They seemed to exist so much more in 3D space than what I experienced previously. I was wondering what, if anything, you consciously did to achieve that quality in your work?

Secondly, when inking, I was wondering about the range of line thickness applied to your figures, and if there was any method you applied to determine just how think (or thin) the line needed to be, and how it transitions from thicker to thinner? (Even looking at a muscular arm, there is a very clear range of thickness that seems to enhance the drawing very much).

Rgds,

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John Byrne
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Posted: 28 June 2006 at 12:43pm | IP Logged | 2  

First Question: I use a perspective grid in about 90% of my drawings, even if there's no background. I want the figures to all exist on the same plane, or at least be relating to the same plane. This is probably what you're seeing -- an almost architectural approach to building the forms withing the panels.

Second Question: An oversimplified explanation would be this: The closer to the "camera", the thicker the line. On forms themselves, think of the line as being an elastic band stretched around the shapes. Think of where such an elastic band would be under greatest pressure. Also, think in terms of shading. Thicker lines on the side away from the light source.

Then remember that, as noted, all of the above is oversimplified, and much of the variation comes from trial and error -- that ol' debbil practise!

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Derek Rogers
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Joined: 07 April 2006
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Posted: 28 June 2006 at 1:07pm | IP Logged | 3  

great tips JB!  i'm always in awe that you are willing to share your "secrets"!

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Guest79877180
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Posted: 28 June 2006 at 1:59pm | IP Logged | 4  

That is some good info.
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Rene Ritchie
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Posted: 28 June 2006 at 8:54pm | IP Logged | 5  

Profound thanks!
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Marcel Chenier
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Joined: 19 May 2006
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Posted: 28 June 2006 at 10:33pm | IP Logged | 6  

JB,
1) When working with the perspective grid, were there any early difficulties/
complications the method presented to your work in comics when you were
just starting out (with the device)? In other words, did you adapt to its use
flawlessly?

2) The grid-practice has proven itself as one that greatly compliments your
style, provides the desired perspective effect, and enhances your
backgrounds. Besides contributing to your style, were there any 'bad art
habits' that this adopted system helped you to overcome that you did not
expect or predict?

. . .cheers!
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