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Topic: Question to John #2: Days of Future Past & the Terminator (Topic Closed Topic Closed) Post ReplyPost New Topic
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Pedro Tavares
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Posted: 12 February 2007 at 8:29am | IP Logged | 1  

When I first watched the Terminator, I was shocked of the similitude between Cameron's post-apocalyptic world and the X-Men's future: the landscape, the giant killing machines, the concentration camps...

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Haven't watched terminator in a while but I don't remember any mention of concentration camps. Didnt the machines just try to kill everybody? now I'll have to watch the movie again :D
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John Byrne
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Posted: 12 February 2007 at 8:46am | IP Logged | 2  

James Cameron's Terminator was much more inspired (ripped off?) from two stories Harlan Ellison wrote for the original Outer Limits, namely "Soldier" and "Demon With a Glass Hand".

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I know Harlan won this suit -- but it is an incredibly slippery slope. If a writer can claim another writer has plaigarised elements from more than one of his stories, can there truly be said to be anything "original" out there? If George Orwll was still around, for instance, he might get all huffy and argue that Ellison's own "Repent Harlequin, said the Ticktock Man" is chapter and verse "1984". And there's hardly a story ever been written that did not contain some elements from previous works.

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John Byrne
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Posted: 12 February 2007 at 8:48am | IP Logged | 3  

Haven't watched terminator in a while but I don't remember any mention of concentration camps.

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The camps are implied by elements of Kyle's descriptions of the future.

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Pedro Tavares
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Posted: 12 February 2007 at 8:56am | IP Logged | 4  

The camps are implied by elements of Kyle's descriptions of the future.

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Thanks :D I really need to watch that movie again :)


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Jerome Bonnet
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Posted: 12 February 2007 at 9:23am | IP Logged | 5  

 John Byrne wrote:
The camps are implied by elements of Kyle's descriptions of the future.

Yes. For instance, Kyle has a barcode laser-printed on his arm.

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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 12 February 2007 at 12:34pm | IP Logged | 6  

Haven't watched terminator in a while but I don't remember any mention of concentration camps.

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The camps are implied by elements of Kyle's descriptions of the future.

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Reese does make explicit mention of such camps in the film:

 

"Most of us were rounded up, put in camps for orderly disposal."

"(John Connor) taught us to fight, to storm the wire of the camps, to smash those metal mother****ers into junk".



 

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Joakim Jahlmar
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Posted: 13 February 2007 at 6:47am | IP Logged | 7  

JB wrote:
"And there's hardly a story ever been written that did not contain some elements from previous works."

Indeed. It is interesting to think that Shakespeare, a writer held in such high regards, would probably have been in some problems writing under today's copyright laws, since many if not most of his plays exist in previous versions by other playwrights. Now old Will was an excellent writer and did bring something to the table, but it shows that literature and art (even great literature art, perhaps even especially that) do have cannibalistic tendencies.



Edited by Joakim Jahlmar on 13 February 2007 at 6:49am
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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 February 2007 at 6:56am | IP Logged | 8  

It is interesting to think that Shakespeare, a writer held in such high regards, would probably have been in some problems writing under today's copyright laws, since many if not most of his plays exist in previous versions by other playwrights.

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One of the distinct advantages to the Oxford solution to the Authorship Question is that it much reduces, if not entirely eliminates, the Shakespeare-as-plaigarist problem. Rather than pirating plays from other authors, DeVere would in many cases have been simply revising his own earlier works.

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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 February 2007 at 6:59am | IP Logged | 9  

Yul Brynner role of a dressed in black killing robot

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If I remember correctly, it was a robotic cowboy.

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Who was dressed in black and killing people.

How's about we call a Full Forum Moratorium on this kind of pointless "correction"?

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Charles Jensen
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Posted: 13 February 2007 at 7:53am | IP Logged | 10  

JB wrote: "How's about we call a Full Forum Moratorium on this kind of pointless "correction"?"

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Ahhhh.. if only! You dream too big my friend. You dream too big. The internet itself could die without those posts! :)
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Joakim Jahlmar
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Posted: 13 February 2007 at 7:54am | IP Logged | 11  

JB wrote:
"One of the distinct advantages to the Oxford solution to the Authorship Question is that it much reduces, if not entirely eliminates, the Shakespeare-as-plaigarist problem. Rather than pirating plays from other authors, DeVere would in many cases have been simply revising his own earlier works."

Still, the literary climate of the time was very much about retelling certain stories over and over, take a piece her and a piece there, so I'm not entirely certain that even the DeVere theory can get around the whole of it.
And to some extent, I think it's still true today. Stories aren't told in a vacuum. Now, I am naturally not promoting downright text theft (being a writer myself, that goes against the grain), but I do believe in the fact that all fictional writing does include a certain cannibalistic element that is derived from what the writers devour as readers. And as Stephen King has repeatedly said, it's not really possible to be a good writer if one does not read.



Edited by Joakim Jahlmar on 13 February 2007 at 7:55am
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Jeff Marvin
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Posted: 13 February 2007 at 8:25am | IP Logged | 12  

The "Demon With A Glass Hand" reference reminded me of the DC graphic novel interpretations they were doing at one time of classic SF stories.  Marshall Rogers did the artwork for the "Demon With A Glass Hand" GN, adn Klaus Janson, IIRC, did one of Ray Bradbury's "Fire and Ice."  Anyone else remember these?

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