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Mike Norris
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 2:31pm | IP Logged | 1  

On another board there was a discussion of the proposed Spider-Man reboot featuring a teen Spider-man,that drifted in a discussion of who is Spider-man. Some like a grown up Spider-man, who's an Avenger and has a steady job ( and a wife and maybe kids!!!!)I thought I'd share my counter argument here:

The question is, should Peter Parker "grow up". Why is that needed or necessary? Spider-man's personna is the wise cracking, hard luck hero who some people don't trust. Peter is a guy who's life never quite comes together because he's Spider-man. It costs him jobs, friends and relationships. A Spider-man with a steady job, a steady girl and membership in the most prestigous Super-Team isn't really Spider-Man. It goes against the core of the character. He can have these things briefly, but in the end it has to fall apart.

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John Byrne
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 3:18pm | IP Logged | 2  

Why does Parker need to be grown up? Because too many of his fans, who should have stopped reading years ago, need to continue to live vicariously thru him.
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Michael Andrew Gonoude
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 3:37pm | IP Logged | 3  

This is why I loved DC's Imaginary Stories in the '60's, and wished Marvel had had something similar at the time; Spider-Man could have grown up and had all sorts of terrible and/or wonderful things happen to him and/or his supporting cast (they could have croaked Aunt May, married Peter off to Gwen Stacy, and had little Spider-Kids running up the walls in webbing diapers) - but everything would be back to normal in the next issue.*  The toys put back in the box, unbroken, as somebody around here is so fond of saying... 

*Just Imagine - What If Mort Weissenger had been a Marvel editor?

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Darren Taylor
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 3:38pm | IP Logged | 4  

These characters were created and aimed at a particular audience.

Why people keep insisting on modifying them beyond this, I don't get. What these people need is a -new- character that they can relate to and leave the original character intact.

 

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Michael Andrew Gonoude
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 3:42pm | IP Logged | 5  

Hey, JB, what do you think Wayne Boring's Spider-Man would've been like?  Or Curt Swan's?  Al Plastino's would've been somewhere in between the two...
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Don Zomberg
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 3:44pm | IP Logged | 6  

It's a bit telling that the "fans" who so often claim to love a character the most are the ones who understand said character the least. If you think Spider-Man should be married (to MJ Watson, of all people) and a member of the Avengers, well, sorry, you really aren't a fan of the character Lee and Ditko created all those years ago.

Their whole philosophy seems to be, "I love Captain Wonderful, but I'd love him even more if he were something completely different."

And of course, those of us who think "First Do No Harm" is a good mandate are accused by the unwashed masses of "defending the status quo."

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Paul Kimball
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 5:49pm | IP Logged | 7  

And of course, those of us who think "First Do No Harm" is a good mandate
are accused by the unwashed masses of "defending the status quo
++++++++
Please make that the very clean masses.
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Steven Myers
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 6:44pm | IP Logged | 8  

I love the "grown up" Spider-Man in Spider-Girl.  Which evolved from a one-shot What If? story, and isn't trying to make sense in Spider-Man's current continuity, but remaining an "imaginary story".

Superman had the "Mr & Mrs Superman" stories for years that let readers see an older Clark and Lois.

And all the above leads me to my conclusion: why age the characters in the current concinuity, when you can always age them in a seperate continuity, and have the best of both worlds?

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Mike Norris
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 10:11pm | IP Logged | 9  

Guy on another board said:

"That was his thing in the 60s. Ever since the 70s, he's been at least in his late 20s, movies notwithstanding."

I dont recall Peter aging that fast in the 70s. Are there any  markers that would make the 70s Peter in his late twenties? Was he still going to College back then?  Drawing a blank on Pete's life in those days.

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Stephen Robinson
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 10:46pm | IP Logged | 10  

Peter Parker is a college graduate, which would place him at 21/22. He was in grad school for a while until the mid 80s but that was the sort of thing that could have been kept fairly open-ended.

I think the marriage is what accelerated his age. Suddenly, people viewed him as late-20s/early 30s, though there was really nothing in the books themselves to make that clear.

If I had my way, Spider-Man would always be a high-school age character with no more than a year's experience.
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Stephen Churay
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Posted: 16 January 2010 at 11:23pm | IP Logged | 11  

The problem I have with characters growing up is they cease to be relevant to what the core audience should be. Does a 10-20 year old really want to know how Peter is have trouble paying the rent or problems with his marriage? Do they care? I think they would be more interested to see if Peter can GET the girl. Same thing with Superman. Once they relationship exists, where do you go from there? It's a lot like many TV shows. Once the couple you want to see get together actually does, the show has jumped the shark. (ex. Moonlighting, Who's The Boss, etc.) I don't find comics any different in that regard.

A 10-20 year old can relate to whether the outsider (Peter) can get the girl. They can relate to Peter's struggle to keep his grades up and still try and be a superhero.

As long as the target audience is the 25-35 year old male, these are the kind of stories we'll get. 
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James Revilla
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Posted: 17 January 2010 at 12:28am | IP Logged | 12  

As long as Twilight boy isn't Parker...I will be happy.
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