Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login
Star Trek
Byrne Robotics > Star Trek << Prev Page of 448 Next >>
Topic: STAR TREK: NEW VISIONS - Origins and Updates Post ReplyPost New Topic
Author
Message
Greg Kirkman
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 15638
Posted: 06 October 2014 at 12:49pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Again, we go back to the original Masters of Trek (basically, the two
Genes), concerning themselves with telling stories, with keeping the
viewers hooked. And knowing that technobabble (not a term even in
use back then) was a good way to LOSE those viewers. Scotty can say
in three words what Geordi needed three paragraphs to cover. And, up,
the latter sounds a whole lot like padding.
++++++++++

As I love to point out, one of the truly genius things about TOS is that it
treated the technology as it would really be--the characters use it as
casually as you or I would use a microwave oven or a hairdryer. There
were almost never any long-winded explanations about what a device
was or how it worked.

In "The Corbomite Maneuver", the first regular episode filmed, Rand
makes a passing reference to heating up coffee with a hand phaser. If
that had been the first episode aired, viewers would have had to figure
that reference on their own.

As it happened, "The Man Trap" ended up being the first to air, and,
being written and filmed several episodes into production, it began
with Kirk, McCoy, and Sturgeon beaming down to the planet--with no
explanation whatsoever. Kirk calls the ship with no explanation as to
what a communicator is. He later stuns Crater with his phaser, and we
get the scarcest lip-service to the nature of the stun effect. And that's it.

My favorite example: we were not told how the transporter works until
the third-to-last episode of the series
, when Kirk explains it to Space
Lincoln.

Roddenberry and his team trusted the audience to figure it out, and
didn't let the technology get in the way of the STORIES. And that is a
lesson I've carried with me, for as long as I've loved sci-fi and fantasy.
Story and character are key. The technology is just dressing, unless it's
hard sci-fi, and therefore the focus.

TOS endures because of story and character. The tech is fun, but it is
not the end-all, be-all.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116863
Posted: 06 October 2014 at 2:06pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

Roddenberry and his team trusted the audience to figure it out...

Which included not giving us an "origin," the first place modern TV and film makers feel compelled to go.   Roddenberry gave us a crew -- technically two -- who were new to neither the ship nor each other. This hath greatly vexed later, more anal fans, who want everything spelled out.

I go back, again, to when I was working on Superman. After the second issue, the Lois issue, came out, I received an angry letter from a fan excoriating me for a line therein referring to Lois as an army brat. Where was this in the first issue? the fan demanded. "If you don't tell us these things, how are we supposed to know?"

There is a whole subset of fandom -- steadily becoming ALL of fandom, it sometimes seems -- that does not want to THINK. When I started reading FANTASTIC FOUR, with No. 5, it was another five issues before Stan got around to calling Reed by his last name. I was totally enthralled by the thrill of the chase, waiting for that piece to drop into place. I was ecstatic when it did. Many fans today, tho, would consider Stan's lapse grave mistake. They don't want to wait. They don't want to figure it out. They want it all -- and yesterday!

Jim Shooter, in fact, used to insist (for the rest of us) that the readers know who everyone is and what they do by PAGE THREE.

Back to Top profile | search
 
Scott Andrews
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 22 July 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 171
Posted: 06 October 2014 at 2:22pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

I was totally enthralled by the thrill of the chase, waiting for that piece to drop into place. I was ecstatic when it did. Many fans today, tho, would consider Stan's lapse grave mistake. They don't want to wait. They don't want to figure it out. They want it all -- and yesterday!

----------------------------------------

Though you weren't referring to it, this applies to movie fans --particularly, right now, Star Wars fans -- who want a plot synopsis from day 1 of filming, trailers 12-18 months before it is released, and who seem OBSESSED with spoiling the movie for themselves (and others)!

Why can't people just wait for something to come out... and be surprised in the theater, or on tv, or while reading???
Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116863
Posted: 06 October 2014 at 3:04pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Some people live their lives as if they are constantly being tested. You can hear this in the way the talk about mundane subjects. No detail too small or unimportant to be left out. Leave them unchecked, and description of a simple trip to the grocery store becomes an epic to rival Homer. Just not as interesting!

These people, and others like them, carry within a fear of Not Knowing. A dread that someone at their school, or work, or LCS might be a few microns further ahead on the curve than they. That they will be caught Not Knowing

(Of the many complaints that seethed out of some corners of fandom when I was hired to reboot Superman, this was the one I felt went unspoken. The self-declared experts had been put on the same playing field as everyone else. They had been caught Not Knowing!)

Back to Top profile | search
 
Andy Meyers
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 05 August 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 567
Posted: 06 October 2014 at 5:46pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

"No detail too small or unimportant to be left out."

I agree. Some people have to show how important they are by providing those details because it seems wrapped up so much with their self-worth. I find myself trying not to say, "Get to the point" often. 

I see the fear of Not Knowing among young people all the time. I believe a lot of has to do with one of their biggest fears, being embarrassed.
Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116863
Posted: 06 October 2014 at 7:23pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Self- correction: that should have read "no detail too small or unimportant to be included."
Back to Top profile | search
 
Greg Kirkman
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 15638
Posted: 06 October 2014 at 9:47pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Which included not giving us an "origin," the first place modern TV and
film makers feel compelled to go.   Roddenberry gave us a crew --
technically two -- who were new to neither the ship nor each other. This
hath greatly vexed later, more anal fans, who want everything spelled
out.
+++++++++

Exactly.

I mean, how hard is it? We know how modern-day military
organizations work. TREK's Starfleet clearly doesn't work in a radically-
different way, by comparison.

The ship was built. Each of our heroes joined the service. And, though
a chain of events--promotions, transfers, deaths, etc.--they all ended up
together on that ship.

Not much of a "story", there!
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116863
Posted: 07 October 2014 at 4:34am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

As an aside, the communicators use the same moire-patterned "data discs" that the tricorders do, so there's really no reason to think that communicators couldn't be used for recordings, playbacks, etc. The interchangeability of the discs would also presumably allow a tricorder to analyze recordings made by a communicator, etc.

Reading thru this thread just now, I came upon this quote from Greg Kirkman. It's from last December, but I thought it was worth resurrecting for a comment or two.

When the communicators made their debut on TOS, there was really nothing like them in the real world. They vaguely resembled walkie-talkies, but wireless and fully self-contained. And, of course, they had a range beyond anything available in the Sixties. NASA couldn't even talk to astronauts in orbit with it sounding like it was all being played thru a fuzz-box!

Significantly, I'm typing this on my iPhone, technology almost half a century further up the line from TOS, and a reminder of just what those "little boxes" might have been able to do, if they were real. The fact that my phone contains a link to the internet, email, a GPS, a camera and, for all intents, a TV STUDIO --- well, what should we expect from a gadget two hundred years further along?

Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116863
Posted: 07 October 2014 at 4:44am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

I get the impression that, if there was only one transporter, then people would have to materialize in small groups if there were more than six at a time, one after the other, with the rest held in the system for a few moments' delay. Except, in "City", everyone materializes at once!

An additional note (and something that supports the "one transporter" argument):

In the opening sequence of "The Apple," the landing party is shown beaming down in two groups, of six and three.

Back to Top profile | search
 
Doug Centers
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 3780
Posted: 07 October 2014 at 6:50am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

Ahh The Apple, (I'm drifting here) probably perpetuated the "red shirt" mythos as much as any other episode. I can't remember but did any of that large security team return alive ?
Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116863
Posted: 07 October 2014 at 7:19am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

As I have noted before, even if there were not plenty of "red shirts" who made it thru the episodes (and, indeed, the series) unscathed -- Scotty for one, arguably Uhura for another -- the "red shirts" were security personnel, the soldiers on the ship. One of the principle jobs of soldiers is to die so that others don't!
Back to Top profile | search
 
Doug Centers
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 3780
Posted: 07 October 2014 at 7:54am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

"One of the principle jobs of soldiers is to die so that others don't!"

...

A truer statement has never been said.
Back to Top profile | search
 

<< Prev Page of 448 Next >>
  Post ReplyPost New Topic
Printable version Printable version

Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot create polls in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

 Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login