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Topic: STAR TREK: NEW VISIONS - Origins and Updates Post ReplyPost New Topic
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Scott Andrews
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 10:30am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Couldn't agree more with what you said, Kirkman.  One of the series' best.  No matter how many times I see the episode, there's some detail or nuance I didn't notice before.

And to what you said I would add that William Windom gives an outstanding performance.  One might be tempted to call it "hammy" at times (my sister still cracks up at his delivery of, "Don't you think I know that?!  There was, but not anymore!").  However, when you see Decker's calm confidence when he first takes over command of the Enterprise you can see, by contrast, the horror of what he had experienced.  Great stuff.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 12:05pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

When I saw GALAXY QUEST for the first time in the theater, and came to the scene where the alien, Quillick, is injured and "Dr. Lazarus" delivers the line he's been fighting against for the first two thirds of the film, I teared up. I teared up every time I saw the movie after that, too. But the third or fourth time I saw it, a woman sitting a few rows ahead of me laughed out loud at that scene.

Some people have souls made of sawdust.

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John Byrne
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 12:08pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Finished issue 8 this morning!!
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Doug Centers
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 12:12pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

"When I saw GALAXY QUEST for the first time in the theater, and came to the scene where the alien, Quillick, is injured and "Dr. Lazarus" delivers the line he's been fighting against for the first two thirds of the film, I teared up. I teared up every time I saw the movie after that, too. But the third or fourth time I saw it, a woman sitting a few rows ahead of me laughed out loud at that scene.

Some people have souls made of sawdust."


...


That scene has choked me up every time I have seen it. (And you will not here me say that often)

I think some people will laugh as a defense mechanism against them kind of moments.

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Scott Andrews
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 2:36pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

That scene in "Galaxy Quest" makes me tear up, too.

I love that movie, it is just so perfect.  A loving, respectful parody and homage to all things Trek including the fandom.  I maintain that, in its own way, it is the best Star Trek movie ever made.  The SECOND time I saw "Galaxy Quest" in the theater -- with friends who hadn't seen it yet -- I was laughing so hard throughout the film that one of my friends leaned over and asked if I was okay.  :-)
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John Byrne
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 5:15pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Of course, that set was introduced because 90% of the episode would otherwise have taken place on the Enterprise Bridge set. As I understand it, there simply wouldn't have been time in the shooting schedule to film the set both in its usual state, and as a properly-redressed/battle-damaged version that would represent the Constellation. Further, having Kirk and Scott hang out on a distinctly different set would make it easier for the audience to remember that they were supposed to be on a different ship.

Strictly for funzies, aboard the Yorktown.....

(As TOS fans know, the series did not color code their ships in this way. It would have been prohibitively expensive to paint and repaint every time another starship made an appearance. But without such limitations in my TREK books -- most notably CREW -- I introduced this idea to distinguish between ships.)

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John Byrne
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 5:22pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

"Oh, and was there a lot of chemistry there between Bones and the Commodore or was I imagining it?"

*****

I thought so too! Very nice interaction between the two in this one.

As I was working on this issue, I got to wondering (not for the first time), just how old "Commodore One" would be. As the ship's "most experienced officer" in "The Cage/The Menagerie," we would not be far off to assume she was at least Majel Barrett's age, 32, in the first pilot. Possibly older. Add thirteen years to that, and it puts her somewhere around 45 in this issue -- or pretty close to DeForrest Kelley's age during the time frame NEW VISIONS covers. Of course, the Network somewhat notoriously wanted McCoy to be closer to Kirk's age, which was around 35, and which is why his daughter, Joanna, disappeared from "The Way to Eden". Even her named vanished from the episode title.

So, is there "chemistry"? Mebbe. If they were actually the same age, I'd say certainly. Don't know about McCoy's history with "older women," tho!

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Stephen Robinson
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 6:47pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

Are the characters ages -- other than Kirk's -- ever
stated on screen? If not, I prefer to think of McCoy and
Scotty as being around the same age as their actors. For
one, it seems reasonable for the heads of departments of
a ship like the Enterprise. And if Kirk is a decade
younger than his senior staff, it would highlight his
"exceptional" nature (another thing that NuTrek lost).

I do think it would be in character for someone like
Kirk to have become good friends with men older than he
is simply because they would more often be his
"colleagues."

THE CAGE made me wonder about Spock's age. Is he older
than Kirk or even McCoy but just aging slower as a
Vulcan or is he Nimoy's age and was just very young in
THE CAGE?
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John Byrne
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 6:54pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

THE CAGE made me wonder about Spock's age. Is he older than Kirk or even McCoy but just aging slower as a Vulcan or is he Nimoy's age and was just very young in THE CAGE?

"The Cage" wasn't actually filmed thirteen years before it was broadcast as "The Menagerie," so Spock's age becomes a bit dodgy. Having met his mother, who was played by an actress of appropriate age to be Leonard Nimoy's mother, at the time, we can't push Spock's age up too high. So if Spock was Nimoy's age in TOS, then he was in his early twenties in "The Menagerie" flashbacks. That would certainly fit his very different behavior!

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Roy Johnson
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 7:53pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply


 QUOTE:
Are the characters ages -- other than Kirk's -- ever
stated on screen?


I don't think they were mentioned in TOS, but ...

in the first season of TNG, McCoy was noted as being 137 years old. I think "The Naked Now" refers to "The Naked Time" being x years ago, but I'm too lazy to look it up. I'm sure "Relics" has something on Scotty's age. From there, it's a bunch of math. Sarek's age was mentioned and possibly Spock's (Picard was at his wedding/).
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 9:47pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

(As TOS fans know, the series did not color code their ships in this way.
It would have been prohibitively expensive to paint and repaint every
time another starship made an appearance. But without such limitations
in my TREK books -- most notably CREW -- I introduced this idea to
distinguish between ships.)
+++++++

Yeah, there were only a handful of tweaks they made to distinguish
between ships--the Lexington Bridge reused the high-backed
Captain's chair from the I.S.S. Enterprise, the Exeter's
dedication plaque was covered with a big blank sheet, and the
Defiant's "pipe cathedral" (behind the wall grate) was lit with blue
gels instead of red.

I do wonder what other differences, if any, would have been
implemented, if there'd been more time and money. I really like the blue
detail-coloring of the Yorktown, myself. It's blatantly different from
the Enterprise-red that we know so well, and it also gives the sister
ship its own look and feel.
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Scott Andrews
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Posted: 12 March 2015 at 10:01pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

All this talk of different ships having different painted colors reminds me of the film "The Hunt For Red October".  The climax to the film had scenes taking place on not one, not two, but THREE separate submarine bridges... and quick cuts back and forth between them.

The (underrated!) director John McTiernan decided to use different colored LIGHTING on each bridge... red, of course, for the Red October and if I'm not mistaken blue for another and either yellow or green for the last.  It really worked well to orient yourself visually where you were for each shot.

Sorry if this post got a bit off topic.  :-)
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