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John Byrne
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Posted: 07 January 2017 at 3:32pm | IP Logged | 1  

Building the second Death Star was nothing more than a trap to lure the Rebels out of hiding in order to finish them off once and for all. Which also points out the Emperor getting desperate as he is losing control of his Empire. One of my favorite ideas in Jedi is how much the rebellion has grown since Star Wars, as evidenced by the diverse races present in the second Death Star fight.

If you ignore the Rebellions inability to do anything right on ESB, it does seem that the destruction of the (original)Death Star leads to their defeat.

Damn that original crawl for flat out lying to us!!

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Joseph Greathouse
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Posted: 07 January 2017 at 4:39pm | IP Logged | 2  

If we take the crawl as gospel, then it was contradicted in Star Wars before the Death Star was even tested. It was stated that the total firepower was equal to only half of the fleet. When the Death Star was destroyed, the remaining 2/3 that previously held the the universe at bay didn't disappear. 
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Andrew Saxon
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 1:15am | IP Logged | 3  

...it introduced a lot of visually cool elements and characters (see: Boba Fett) that had that same attractive air of mystery around them that made Wolverine so popular.

Boba Fett is my own 'I don't get it!!!' about Star Wars. When I watch The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, not being caught up in the cult surrounding the character and viewing him dispassionately, he doesn't seem to do very much. I'm sure I must be missing something (maybe because of my Autism) but I do not understand all the admiration for this character I see in Star Wars fandom.
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 1:25am | IP Logged | 4  

The coolness of Boba Fett probably runs parallel to the Ewok Line.

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John Byrne
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 6:31am | IP Logged | 5  

Boba Fett's outrageous celebrity began with the TOY. The character was introduced in that form, and the fans went nutz building his story. By the time the movie came out and he proved lame and ineffectual, the wave had already taken on tsunami proportions. Same thing happened later with Darth Maul.

And BOTH had silly names.

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Brian Hague
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 9:18am | IP Logged | 6  

Michael, I'd only ever heard about the "Ewok line." Thanks for the illustration.

Boba Fett was kind of cool and mysterious in his 1978 appearance on the Holiday Special. The animated version was an unsentimental, dragon-riding, rumbly-voiced badass who turned out to be working for Darth Vader the entire time he was helping Chewie and the Droids save Han and Luke. Calling everybody "friend" and almost gliding through his movements, there was a lot to intrigue audiences in those few moments, and the cartoon ends with the promise of more to come. 

Disappointment set in almost immediately when the 1979 "rocket-firing" action figure did no such thing, projectile toys being seen as lethal to kids after a child died choking on a Battlestar Galactica Viper missile. Boba then appeared in Empire where he was only one of a number of supposedly badass bounty hunters, all of whom just stood there and posed for their trading cards. So, maybe they were saving him for his really big role to come in ROTJ..? Nope. 

Mostly what I hear from fans these days is that Boba "went out like a bitch." He's seen as a punchline to the people I've spoken with, same as he was to Lucas in ROTJ. Boba Fett today is largely an object lesson in fan anticipation; a lesson repeated with Darth Maul and General Grevious, who at least got some live-action screen time to compensate for their general lack of impact otherwise. 


Edited by Brian Hague on 09 January 2017 at 9:20am
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Don Zomberg
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 10:37am | IP Logged | 7  

Joseph, I thought it was stated the Death Star had a firepower GREATER than half the star fleet.

In the end it doesn't matter, though. We are told by the opening crawl that destroying the Death Star will "restore freedom to the galaxy," pure and simple.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 1:35pm | IP Logged | 8  

It's interesting -- well, to me, anyway -- how the roots of STAR WARS fandom is so different from comic fandom.

The latter grew in an environment in which the past was always accessible. When comic fans paid their money for the product, they took it home with them, to experience over and over again, for years and even decades to come. Rare was the movie fan who was able to duplicate that experience.

So, when STAR WARS was born, there was not yet a way to repeat the experience, beyond a novelization and a comicbook adaptation. And those told stories decidedly different from each other and the movie.

Thus, when the first "sequel" came along, and told yet another version of the story, fans mostly had memory to work from. And in this way comic fans and SW fans split. Comic fans demanded "continuity," while SW fans began their earnest defense of just the opposite.

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Michael Penn
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 2:40pm | IP Logged | 9  

STAR WARS in 1977 was a phenomenon one would have to see to believe. Yet, I can't help but think about the millions who not only didn't see it... but didn't see just it. Those millions who imbibed Star Wars stuff either instead of or along with the movie -- the novels, the comicbooks, the toys, the TV special, the book & record, whatever else there was! -- some of it either contemporary with but most of it immediately following the movie's theatrical release, they must have already had lost an ability to have anything but an "expanded universe" mindset. 
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 2:49pm | IP Logged | 10  

I'm pretty sure that I saw ESB before STAR WARS. For me, there was
only ever an "expanded universe".
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Warren Scott
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 8:36pm | IP Logged | 11  

An interesting thing about most of the Star Wars movies is they are mostly segments of an ongoing story with gaps between them. Since they were inspired by Flash Gordon serials, you could argue it's like watching a few chapters of a serial, skipping over a few chapters, watching a few more and so on. It can be charming and unnerving. It can be fun to think about what adventures they had in between (and of course, there are lots of books and comics to fill that gap). But I also was unsatisfied with "Empire" because it doesn't really have an ending. And I wrongly assumed, because of the ending of "Attack of the Clones," that "Revenge of the Sith" would focus on the Clone Wars. Instead that was the focus of an animated television series.
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Warren Scott
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Posted: 09 January 2017 at 8:50pm | IP Logged | 12  

One more observation about Star Wars and I'll give someone else a turn. I think one thing George Lucas and probably a lot of people didn't realize is that part of its charm is what it leaves to the viewers' imagination. Though I liked the battle between Obi-Wan and Anakin in "Revenge of the Sith," I think it was hard for Lucas and company to live up to the expectations of those who had envisioned it earlier.
I think the appeal of Boba Fett in "Empire" and "Jedi" is he's a man of mystery throughout. If you were one of the kids who sent away for the figure as I did (No, I didn't get the one with the firing missile.), you had to wait until "Empire" came out to learn about him (I saw the holiday special but remember very little about it. I think I must have gone to the bathroom when the cartoon was on.). And if you were a kid, you played with the figure and filled in the details yourself. When "Empire" came out, unless you imagined him to be a good guy with a soft voice, your expectations weren't spoiled. Until "Attack of the Clones" anyway.
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