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Topic: STAR TREK: INSURRECTION (1998) - 20 years! Post ReplyPost New Topic
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Greg Kirkman
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Joined: 12 May 2006
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Posted: 07 February 2019 at 11:14pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

haven't seen Discovery's Mudd yet, but "Mudd's Women" does hint at the possibility that nothing good happened to Leo Walsh for Mudd to assume his identity. He is more devious and capable in that episode than he is in the later "I, Mudd." We tend to import the light comedy of that Mudd backwards, I think, into our take on the overall character. Again, I have no love for the idea of Discovery revisiting Mudd or for their casting choice, but a murderous Mudd doesn't strike me as too far afield for the character. 
++++++++

The lightening up of Mudd is actually mentioned in the TREKSPERTS discussion. Its not a case of someone else coming along and changing the character, either, since Stephen Kandel wrote both episodes. Mudd was subtly sinister in his first appearance, yes, but the audio clips from STD presented in the Podcast (which made me yell expletives at my iPod out of sheer frustration) paint Mudd as a full-on villain who spits out threats of murderous vengeance as a result of being separated from his beloved Stella. Groan.

The character as played by a Roger C, Carmel was more of a smooth-talking-type who lures you in and gets you off-balance with his wacky charm before he sticks the knife in your back. A scheming conman who hides behind a larger-than-life veneer, along with his constant protests of innocence. But, hey, subtlety is dead, these days. 


Edited by Greg Kirkman on 07 February 2019 at 11:33pm
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Brian Hague
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Posted: 08 February 2019 at 12:20am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

It may be worth noting that Roddenberry and his team rewrote every script that came across their desks, often several times. It was one of the points of contention between Gene L. Coon and Roddenberry that he would bring in fine, accomplished professionals whose work would then be papered over by Roddenberry, who was intent upon having creative ownership of Trek in all respects, from the great to the small.

Roddenberry was there for "Mudd's Women," and that script received a great deal of attention since it was one of their first. He was completely absent during the final stages of "I, Mudd" and only found out about the high level of humor it contained after the fact. "I, Mudd" was another straw on the camel's back of Coon's involvement with the show and thereafter held by Roddenberry of an example of how NOT to do Trek. 

Had Roddenberry not been away working on his Robin Hood project, I wonder what might have been done to bring "I, Mudd" a little closer to the earth, so to speak, and whether or not Mudd himself would have a more dangerous edge.

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John Byrne
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Posted: 08 February 2019 at 7:30am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

It may be worth noting that Roddenberry and his team rewrote every script that came across their desks, often several times.

Everybody knows that only happened to Harlan!!

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