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John Byrne
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Grumpy Old Guy

Joined: 11 May 2005
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 5:15am | IP Logged | 1  

Speaking of Deadman, I saw Boston Brand's name in one of the Black
Lantern promos... if he comes back, what does that make him...

••

The latest victim of DC's creative bankruptcy.
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Glenn Brown
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 5:26am | IP Logged | 2  

Yep, I remember when you posted about the German Batman edition and searched high and low until I found it on eBay.  Was so impressed with it I actually bought two copies.
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Stephen Robinson
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 7:26am | IP Logged | 3  

I'd seen bits of Adams work over the years (the Batman issues and those amazing DC covers) but I recall Christmas Eve of 2003, when I picked up the first Batman Illustrated. I had issues with some of the Lucasizing of the work but overall, I was blown away. Perhaps I was at the age where I didn't take the work for granted as merely "pretty." I found the sheer storytelling genius to be a revelation. A great comic book artist is like a great film director, cinematographer, actor, and costume designer all in one and Adams is that all in spades.


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John Byrne
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Grumpy Old Guy

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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 7:35am | IP Logged | 4  

…great comic book artist is like a great film director, cinematographer, actor, and costume designer all in one…

••

Not to suggest I think I am "great" (old timers on this Forum know that is far from the case!), but this is something I point out often to civilians, and it is always fun to see the lightbulb come on over their heads as they realize just what goes into the production of what they had, until that moment, thought of as "just comicbooks".

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Brandon Carter
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 7:47am | IP Logged | 5  

Yes. Plus, a few years back Paul Kupperberg gave me a large German
edition of a whole lot of Neal's Batman, black and white and printed about
2/3rds of the size of the actual art. Very nice.

*****

How does 2/3 of the actual art size compare with the size of the printed page?  (Originally printed page, I mean.)



Edited by Brandon Carter on 27 June 2009 at 7:49am
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John Byrne
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 7:57am | IP Logged | 6  

American comics are usually drawn at 10x15 inches and printed at around 6x9. The German book is maybe 20% bigger than the original comics, but it makes a difference! Especially in black and white!
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Wallace Sellars
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 8:44am | IP Logged | 7  

Marvel recently released Neal's X-Men work in the b&w Essentials format,
Essential Classic X-Men #3...with zero art retouching. Absolutely beautiful
work from him and Tom Palmer. Highly recommended.
---
Thanks for the heads up, Glenn. Since it's unlikely I'll ever read those issues
on the X-MEN CD-ROM, I'll probably order that via Amazon.
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Jeremiah Hetherington
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 10:14am | IP Logged | 8  

It's difficult for me to articulate the power of Neal Adams' artistry. For most of my life I've just felt it. Looking at his work is a visceral experience. My first memory of seeing his work was his iconic Batman pose from "The Joker's Five-Way Revenge." I believe I saw it in a Treasury Edition in the 1970s. I must have been about 10 or 11. That drawing etched itself into my memory. I'd never seen the character portrayed as dynamically as that before. It is, to my eyes, the definitive rendering of Batman.

Years later I'd become ga-ga over artists like Byrne, Miller, Aparo, Sienkiewicz, Newton, Bingham, etc. But it wasn't until recently I realized that I was reacting to memories of Adams from all those years ago. Those artists, while original in their own right, seem to me to have been directly influenced by Adams. Their art carried that same dynamic flair, that same ability to meld realism with the fantastic. I realized that Adams had set the artistic "template" in my mind.

To this day, only Adams-styled comic art truly excites me. I can appreciate other styles, sure, but for me, it all starts and ends with Neal.

Enjoy, Brad! You're holding magic in your hands.

 

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Brad Krawchuk
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 11:29am | IP Logged | 9  

I have a lot of Batman books (like No Man's Land, Knightfall, etc) that I'm no longer going to be able to read again, because Batman no longer looks "right" in them the way he does in the Adams book.

I'm telling you, that's power. A guy who's work I'd never really read before has now become the definitive Batman artist for me, and I'm starting to feel embarrassed that I own some of the books that I do with Batman in them.

Why? Why did it take me this long to 'get it'?

Also, as JB pointed out about the chronological aspects of Adams development, I must point out I've only read THREE stories in the HC. Just finished the Deadman/Batman team up. This stuff gets BETTER?

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Keith Thomas
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 12:14pm | IP Logged | 10  

It's hard looking at Neal's stuff and realizing how so few
other artists "get it". The fact that so many clueless fans
go gaga over such artists just makes it worse.
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John Byrne
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Grumpy Old Guy

Joined: 11 May 2005
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 12:23pm | IP Logged | 11  

As far as appreciation by modern fans, I think the main problem Neal has is that he is simply too good. Years ago, Larry Hama defined the success of artists like Todd McFarlane and Rob Liefeld as being due to "copiability". Most comic fans nurture a dream, somewhere, of being comicbook artists themselves, and these low-end artists basically said "Yes! You can!" Which was just what the fans wanted to hear. Neal, on the other hand, says (thru his art), "Yes, you can -- but it will be a lot of hard work getting there!"

The industry was in much better shape when the latter was the rule.

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Jeff Stockwell
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Posted: 27 June 2009 at 12:50pm | IP Logged | 12  

That is SO true. I remember when I was a kid, and even when I was an art
student, trying to draw like Neal Adams (because his stuff was JUST SO
COOL!!) with one of his books right next to my paper, and being amazingly
frustrated that even when I was trying to do a straight-up copy it just never
looked right. It drove me absolutely nuts. The difference for me was I didn't
want to draw like the Image boys. I wanted to draw like Adams, Byrne, Alan
Davis and Mort Drucker. Y'know...guys who were good.
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