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Michael Penn
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Joined: 12 April 2006
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Posted: 23 June 2022 at 3:39pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

"Follow the money," Ron. I would never dispute that. But even if the motive is mixed, the outcome is pretty good.
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Wallace Sellars
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Joined: 01 May 2004
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Posted: 23 June 2022 at 4:15pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply


 QUOTE:
Kind of like Branch Rickie's main motivation (according to him) for recruiting Jackie Robinson to the Brooklyn Dodgers was to win more baseball games. The historic part of it was just a bonus.


Branch Rickey's selection of Jackie Robinson was well-calculated. If I correctly recall, Rickey also said there were more talented Black players he could have brought on board, but Robinson showed a temperament that convinced him the man could take racial abuse from fans and fellow players without retaliating.
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Mark Odom
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Joined: 29 April 2021
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Posted: 24 June 2022 at 5:03pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

It’s funny, I remember when I found out that you were moving over to Fantastic Four from X-Men. I was a little bummed for a minute that you weren’t staying with them, but I was so excited, because I knew FF was a perfect fit for you based on the earlier work with them.
When the first issue came out, I was knocked out by the look of the art with you inking yourself. I noticed right away that the art and script fit much tighter than many of the other books done in the Marvel style. 
I know that there were a bunch of fans that were mad that you changed books, but after a few months, things settled down, and we ended up getting more powerful stories.
I’m still amazed at the difference that you inking pencils instead of Terry or Joe S. produced.  Fun times.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 24 June 2022 at 5:15pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

When I was a young ‘un and credits started to appear with regularity, I puzzled over what an “inker” was. I finally decided it must be whoever did the colors—tho that couldn’t really explain the great differences seen in the art.

It was something of an epiphany when I learned the truth.

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Stéphane Garrelie
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Joined: 05 August 2005
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Posted: 24 June 2022 at 5:23pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

Of course, the term "artist" used in the US credits is ambigue.
All of you are artists: the writer, the penciler, the inker and the colorist.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 24 June 2022 at 6:10pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

I fought for a long time with Chris over his use of “Author” for himself, “Artist” for me, and “Inker” for Terry. I insisted that Terry was just as much an “artist” as I was, and that as co-plotter I was every bit as much an “author” as Chris.

Credit where credit is due—for everyone—has been a campaign throughout my career.

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Rebecca Jansen
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Joined: 12 February 2018
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Posted: 25 June 2022 at 12:13am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

I remember an artist telling me how for ages, well into adulthood, he'd thought comics were drawn the same small size as they were published.
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Paul Wills
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Joined: 18 August 2018
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Posted: 25 June 2022 at 12:42am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

Speaking of which, I know a lot of effort goes into drawing those 11x17 pages. Back in the good ol' days sometimes I would pick up a comic that had murky/blurry print (covers notwithstanding). It had to be somewhat frustrating for the artist to see their work not being reproduced as nicely as it was originally drawn.
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John Byrne
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Posted: 26 June 2022 at 12:47pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

Looking back at the ol’ letterpress/newsprint comics of yore, I wonder how I could have loved ‘em so much. Certainly my own work suffered under that printing. A case of “the only game in town”, I guess.
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Joe Smith
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Posted: 26 June 2022 at 2:04pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

I worked the dark room area for a commercial print shop for 11 years. There
were so many things that could go wrong to cause muddy line work.

The vacuum board being the only mechanical error. All others were in the
pursuit to save time and cut corners.



E.G: trying to develop too many pieces of film at once. Trying to get too
many pieces of artwork on the live artwork board. Not getting a good
vacuum seal when burning the plates. Trying to use less plate developer
solution to save money.



no doubt in my mind that Terry Austin had a huge influence on my work at
the print shop. His zip-a-tone use made me very aware of how things can
“close up“. Not on my watch.
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ron bailey
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Joined: 16 October 2016
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Posted: 26 June 2022 at 4:04pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

What I have found interesting is how the art has evolved given the improved printing capabilities. 

How would the old guard have approached their style without the limitations they were working with at the time?   < id="protanopia"> < id="deuteranopia"> < id="tritanopia">
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Vinny Valenti
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Posted: 28 June 2022 at 10:34pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

In my youth, I mistakenly thought that in some cases the letterer handled the scripting. In a way, I could see how I made that assumption, particularly with how well Tom Orzechowski's style meshed so well with Claremont's increasing dialogue 'ticks', and there was a time when his work was not appearing on other writers' books. The spell was broken when I saw Orz on a Louise Simonson issue of NEW MUTANTS, and the dialogue was decidedly different!

Edited by Vinny Valenti on 28 June 2022 at 10:34pm
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